Winter’s cold is still here, the windows have been closed for months, the heat is running and the humidifier appears to have found a permanent home in the bedroom. It can be tough to keep the air inside homes of high quality during the winter.

In mid-January, authorities estimated more than 2 million people worldwide had died from COVID-19, including more than 400,000 in the United States.

As 2020 unfolded, the world learned just how quickly the novel coronavirus COVID-19 could spread. The World Health Organization noted that, by September 2020, nearly 30 million people across the globe had contracted the virus, and that was before the resurgence of the virus in mid-fall.

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“The pandemic has worsened stress, as boundaries between home and work have been blurred,” says Dr. Alex Dimitriu, founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine in Menlo Park, California. 

Yoga practitioners know that a daily dose of sun can help focus the mind, improve circulation and tone muscles. Now the face can get in on the action, as well, thanks to face yoga, an anti-aging exercise regime for the face.

Muscle pain and muscle aches are part of life and can happen to just about everyone. Whether they’re from tension, stress, a sports injury or a medical condition, everyday living can sometimes be a literal pain in the neck — and exacerbate related bodily aches, too. These aches usually affect the support structures that allow movement in daily life: the bones, the muscles, the ligaments and the tendons.

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Winter is the customary cold and flu season, and a time during which many people aren’t as vigilant about maintaining their health as they might be at other times of the year. This winter has the additional variable of the coronavirus pandemic, which surged into 2021 with a second wave of spread and infection.

Barbara Bell knows the importance of medical care and regular visits to the doctor, and why they’re vital for her during the pandemic. Bell, a retired teacher, has rheumatoid arthritis and takes medication that suppresses her immune system.

January is National Blood Donor Month, but there is never a bad time to be a blood donor and help save lives. Extreme winter weather in some parts of the country and seasonal illnesses often make it difficult for blood banks to maintain sufficient blood supplies during this time of year, so the American Red Cross urges healthy people to give now and encourage others to do the same. Without more donors, patients will not have the blood they need.